Is rusting a chemical change?

Answer

The formation of rust represents a chemical change. When a chemical change occurs, the substance or substances present at the beginning are no longer present at the end of the change. Once a chemical change occurs, it theoretically cannot be undone.

Conversely, when a physical change occurs, the material that is the subject of the physical alteration is unchanged. A physical change theoretically is capable of being undone. One example of this is melting an ice cube; once the ice cube melts, the material (water) remains the same and can be refrozen back into a solid. The rust that forms as the result of a chemical change, on the other hand, is a different type of material than the original object that underwent the transformation. A change has occurred at the atomic level that cannot be undone.

Reference:
Q&A Related to "Is rusting a chemical change?"
Rusting is a redox reaction, short for oxidation-reduction.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_chemical_change_is_...
The chemical formula for rust is Fe2O3.nH2O. Rust is caused by the corrosion of iron and occurs in the alloy of steel. Man has spent countless hours and dollars working on solutions
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Science/Chemistry/w...
Rust is an iron oxide with different properties than iron metal, so Rust makes
http://www.chacha.com/question/why-is-rusting-iron...
Because it is formed by turning Fe and O2 to iron oxide. You get a new substance you did not start with.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201001...
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