Can You Be Extradited from One State to Another?

Answer

The US Constitution contains an extradition clause that addresses the extradition of fugitives from one state to another. Several steps must be met before the fugitive can be extradited, but as long as those steps are met extradition can and does happen.
1 Additional Answer
Extradition refers to the official procedure where one country surrenders a suspected or convicted criminal to another country. If you committed crime in a certain state you can be extradited from the state you are leaving at present to the state where the crime was committed. The state where the crime was committed normally gives the warrant. This process is also known as interstate rendition.
Q&A Related to "Can You Be Extradited from One State to Another..."
Extradition is when someone who has committed a crime is sent back to the state the crime happened. All states have extradition rights and can say they do not want to extradite a
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Extradition cases can be extremely complex time-consuming and costly. Demanding states rarely issue extradition warrants for minor offenses. DUI are overwhelmingly considered minor
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If the holding state has notified the extraditing state and the process has begun, it can take as long as it takes. There is no statutory time period in which the process must be
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You can be extradicted from one state to another on many charges, m...
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