Convert Newton Meters to Foot Pounds?

Answer

A person can convert a Newton meter to foot-pounds by utilizing an energy converter. The Newton meters will be needed in order to determine the foot pounds. The conversion is typical in the electrical field.
Q&A Related to "Convert Newton Meters to Foot Pounds?"
1. Turn on the calculator. 2. Enter the Newton meter value. 3. Multiply the Newton meter value by 0.737562149 to calculate the foot-pounds value. 4. Go to an online unit conversion
http://www.ehow.com/how_5935841_convert-newton-met...
100 Newton meters is equal to 73.76 foot-pounds of torque. Thanks for asking
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-100-newton-...
To convert Newton-meters to Foot-pounds, multiply by 0.7375 To convert Foot-pounds to Newton-meters, multiply by 1.3558
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Newton+meter+to+foot+lb+...
Each foot pound is 1.3546 joules. Each Kg.meter is 9.8067 joules. So each Kg. meter is 7.23955 foot pound (divide 9.8067 by 1.3546) . Now if you multiply the 220-225 to 7.23955 you
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1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: convert newton meters to foot pounds
How to Convert a Newton Meter to Foot-Pounds
A Newton meter is a unit of measurement of torque. One Newton meter is the force of one Newton over a one-meter distance. You can convert Newton meters to foot-pounds, a unit of measurement of force. One foot-pound is the force of one pound over a... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
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