How many square yards are in a ton of asphalt?

Answer

The number of square yards per ton of asphalt varies greatly depending on the thickness of the finished product. A cubic yard of asphalt weighs 2.05 tons.

A ton of asphalt, spread to 1/2-inch thickness, covers more than 35 square yards, but does not last long. Spread to 3 inches over a properly prepared base, the same amount of material covers only 5.85 square yards, but with proper maintenance, the 3-inch cover provides a driveway lasting 20 to 30 years. Asphalt provides a cheaper option than concrete that is also more flexible and less susceptible to cracking or damage from ice melting products one uses in the winter months.

Q&A Related to "How many square yards are in a ton of asphalt?"
54 sq ft.
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75 to 80 sq ft depending if its 4% or 6% oil in the mix! this is what i do for a living its very diffrent from cement because the paver has a screed that floats to keep most low spots
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