What is a concentrated solution?

Answer

A concentrated solution is one in which there is a large amount of substance present in a mixture. The degree of concentration is measured in moles.

An aqueous solution contains at least two substances: the solvent, water and a solute — the matter that will be dissolved in the water. The amount of solute that is dissolved in a solvent is the concentration. To keep track of the concentration, you can keep track of the mass. However, many find it easier to measure liquids using molarity, which is the number of moles of solute in a solution divided by the volume of the solution in liters.

Q&A Related to "What is a concentrated solution?"
Concentrated solution is a solution that contains a large amount of solute relative to the amount that could dissolve.
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A concentrated solution is one in which a lot of the water is removed or there is as much of the chemical dissolved in the water as the water can hold. If you think of pouring sugar
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A concentrated solution is a solution (liquid mixture) that has a
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1. Calculate the formula weight of the solute in grams (g) per mole (mol) This involves looking up the atomic weight for each element in the compound (found on the periodic table)
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Explore this Topic
A concentrated solution is a solution that has more solute than the solvent can absorb. In the UK, the concentrated solution of sugar in water is used to make ...
Osmotic concentration refers a measure of solute concentration in a solution. These particles must be osmotically active for the process of osmosis to take place ...
Common commercial examples of concentrated solutions are hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid. Hand soap, soft drinks and liquid medicine are concentrated solutions ...
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