Definition of Chemical Change?

Answer

The definition of a chemical change is in the form of a chemical reaction. As a result, a substance changes to another. There are different triggers that are followed in such a reaction, such as change in temperature, or emission of light.
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The definition of a chemical change is that it describes which changes are possible for a substance. A change in which one or more substances combine or break apart to form new substances
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1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: definition of chemical change
chemical change
NOUN
1.
Chemistry a usually irreversible chemical reaction involving the rearrangement of the atoms of one or more substances and a change in their chemical properties or composition, resulting in the formation of at least one new substance: The formation of rust on iron is a chemical change.
Source: Dictionary.com
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