Difference between a Phrase and a Clause?

Answer

A phrase is a group of words without a subject. A clause is a group of words with a subject and a verb.
Reference:
Q&A Related to "Difference between a Phrase and a Clause?"
Nan Erwin 's answer points in the right direction, but isn't quite there. The first thing to understand is that common usage and technical usage are not always the same. I think
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A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb. Question: What is the difference between phrases and clauses? The difference between phrases and clauses can be confusing
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1. Determine the phrase you want to change into a clause. A phrase can be a single word or a few words, but should lack a subject and verb. For example, the prepositional phrase &
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Clause is a group of words containing a subject and predicate and f...
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