Elevated Bun Levels?

Answer

Elevated bun levels are normally associated with kidney disease, liver disease, diabetes, heart failure and malnutrition. Bun stands for blood urea nitrogen and the test is performed to check on how well the kidneys are functioning. High protein intake can also lead to a higher than normal bun level reading. Normally this test is performed by taking a blood sample. Normal range for this test is between 8 to 24 milligrams per deciliter for men and women have a range of 6 to 21 milligrams per deciliter.
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