What Is a Rhetorical Situation?

Answer

The rhetorical situation was first defined by Loyd Bitzer in a paper he wrote in 1966. Simply put, it is the context of a rhetorical event. An example would be Martin Luther King, Jr.'s speech entitled I Have a Dream. In this speech, Dr. King was attempting to convince the American people of the rightness of racial equality, and to further motivate those already involved in the cause.
Q&A Related to "What Is a Rhetorical Situation"
A rhetorical situation is one that is made up for the sake of the argumentative process. The more realistic a rhetorical situation the more valid of a point it will make during the
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A president speaking to a country in time of crisis. A coach addressing players in the midst of losing a game. A professor lecturing. A political rally. A corporate board meeting.
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A rhetorical question is normally one that does not expect an answer. It is commonly included for its effect on a reader or listener. So a paragraph in a book might begin: 'Who, then
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I'm not of the mindset, ever, to tackle film theory by any means. I'm a storyteller, not a film theorist. I think one example that jumped to my mind was David Mamet's Glengary Glen
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