Examples of Defensive Listening?

Answer

Defensive listening is a very common occurrence with people all over the world. In simple terms, defensive listening is when a person hears only what they want to hear. They always think that an innocent comment is bad and directed only at the listener. Of course, there is no sure and the only way to stop this behavior is to explain to the person that they have it all wrong. There are many examples of defensive listening, one example is when a wife asks her husband to do a simple task and the husband erupts thinking she is nagging him, but instead she only asked a simple questions.
Q&A Related to "Examples of Defensive Listening?"
Defensive listening is when people take innocent comments as personal attacks. It's probable that defensive listeners suffer from unstable self-images and avoid facing this by projecting
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_defensive_listen...
M.A.D. The doctrine of mutual assured destruction prevented and still prevents nuclear powers from going to war. This is probably the single most effective defensive strategy ever
http://www.quora.com/What-are-the-best-examples-of...
Defensive Listening - this listener thinks the speaker is out to get them and reads into
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-defensive-l...
Examples of self-defense are running away from a fight, reacting to a door opening in one's face & avoiding getting hit & preventing someone from hurting you.
http://www.kgbanswers.com/what-are-some-examples-o...
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Defensive listening can be defined as a technique in which an individual makes out the remarks that are made by another as a personal attack. In such cases the ...
Perceptual defense is where an individual simply refuses to see or accept the event as it happens. They effectively re-write events to suit their viewpoint. This ...
Passive listening is hearing what a person says without responding to them in any way. The person listening does not show any reaction to what they have heard. ...
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