Examples of Double Jeopardy?

Answer

Double jeopardy is a term used in court proceedings. Double jeopardy is when a person can not be charged with the same crime twice in their life. OJ Simpson is a good example of the double jeopardy law. He was acquited for the murders of Nicole Simpson and Ron Goldman, Even thought after the case was over, new evidence came to light. Prosecutors could not ever charge OJ Simpson with murder again. Another case example of double jeopardy was the Benton v. Maryland court case in 1969.
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