What words have a soft "J" sound?

Answer

There are no English words with a soft "J" sound. According to the Oxford Dictionary, the letter "J" has one sound in the English language, and it is pronounced as /j?/ or /juh/. This sound is the same as the pronunciation of a soft "G," as in the word "giraffe."

Some "J" words in the English language are judge, just, jet, jack, jelly, jury, jam, January and jazz. The letter "J" makes the same sound in all English words. Some "G" words in the English language that feature a similar sound, but are spelled with a soft "G," are geography, gist, giant, gerbil, gem, geometry, Georgia and ginger. Words with a hard "G" sound are great, good, goal, grind, goat, grip, go, gather and glory.

The English pronunciation of the letter "J" changes in foreign words used by English speakers. Examples are the French word "jour," in which the letter "J" sound is pronounced as /?u?/, and the Spanish word "jalapeño," in which the letter "J" sound is more like the English letter "H," and is pronounced as /häl??p?ny?/.

Dictionaries, both online and in print, offer pronunciation guides. These resources are helpful in clearing up any confusion of the "J" sound in English words and common foreign words used in the English language.

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