Explain How to Reduce Fractions?

Answer

A fraction has a denominator, which is at the bottom, and a numerator, which is at the top. Reducing fractions only requires ones knowledge of the different types of integers and their factors. Having a fraction reduced to its lowest term means that both the numerator and denominator do not have any factors in common. Therefore fractions are reduced every time there is a common factor until there are no factors that are the same between the two. At this point the fraction is said to have been reduced to its lowest level.
Q&A Related to "Explain How to Reduce Fractions?"
To reduce fractions may take a few steps if you can't see the factors right away. The first step would be to factor both the denominator and numerator. The second step is to eliminate
http://answers.ask.com/Science/Mathematics/how_to_...
1. Divide the denominator by the numerator. If you get an answer (or quotient) with no remainder, then that divisor (in this case, the numerator of the fraction) is the greatest common
http://www.ehow.com/how_4925603_reduce-odd-fractio...
1 List the factors of the numerator and denominator. Factors are numbers that you multiply together to get another number. For example, 3 and 4 are both factors of 12, because you
http://www.wikihow.com/Reduce-Fractions
55 when written as a fraction, is. 55. /. 1. already as reduced as it can get.
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Reducing fractions is in a sense like doing division. All you have to do in order to correctly reduce a fraction, is to see how many times the top number will ...
To reduce fractions you must find a common number that both the top number and the bottom number can be divided by to get a whole number. For example if you have ...
To reduce fractions may take a few steps if you can't see the factors right away. The first step would be to factor both the denominator and numerator. The second ...
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