How many lung lobes does a fetal pig have?

Answer

According to the State University of New York, a fetal pig has a total of seven lung lobes. The right lung is larger and is divided into four lobes: the apical, cardiac, diaphragmatic and intermediate. The left lung has three lobes because it does not have an intermediate lobe.

Each lung is located in a separate pleural cavity, which is the space between the lung and the thoracic body wall. A fetal pig's lungs have pleural membranes. One pleural membrane lines the inner surface of the pleural cavity, and the other covers the outer surface of the lung. The lungs of a fetal pig are almost solid because they have never been inflated. Once inflation occurs, the lungs have a spongy appearance.

Q&A Related to "How many lung lobes does a fetal pig have?"
They Have Four Lobes.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_lobes_of_the_lu...
It's been a few years since I've had anatomy, but I believe the pig has 4 lobes. whereas we have 3 lobes on the right side, and 2 on the left.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200905...
The left lung contains three lobes and the right lung contains four. Each
http://www.chacha.com/question/where-is-the-access...
The answer is the same in any animal, even the human ones. Think about what the function of the lungs are. They are to take in oxygen and transport it across the alveolar membranes
http://ph.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200...
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