What are horse tranquilizers used for?

Answer

According to Santa Cruz Animal Health, horse tranquilizers are used to sedate horses prior to handling, physical examination and surgical procedures. Horse tranquilizers are also referred to as equine sedatives and are suitable for ponies, foals, pregnant mares and stallions.

The most commonly used horse tranquilizer is acepromazine maleate. The medication is injected into the horse's muscle and works to suppress the central nervous system, in turn causing relaxation and drowsiness. Acepromazine maleate also promotes deep muscle relaxation, which hinders spontaneous kicking and thrusting during surgical procedures.

Adverse side effects of acepromazine maleate include respiratory distress and mild depression when administered in high doses. The depressive symptoms tend to dissipate within 24 hours.

Q&A Related to "What are horse tranquilizers used for?"
If you are asking what is used to tranquilize a horse, it could be any of several different classes of drugs ranging from acepromazine to opioids.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_in_a_Horse_tranq...
1. Gather the materials needed to build a barn: 3,000 gold, 12 pieces of stone and 12 pieces of lumber. 2. Ask the carpenter at the carpenter shop to build your barn. 3. Populate
http://www.ehow.com/how_6021036_horse-tree-tranqui...
Acepromazine may change heart and respiratory rate, and provides no
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-the-horse-t...
ScienceDaily (May 6, 2008) — Researchers have shown exactly how the anaesthetic ketamine helps depression with images that show the orbitofrontal cortex – the part of
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/05/08050...
Explore this Topic
PCP is short for chemical Phencyclidine. This was first developed as a surgical anesthetic during World War I but was deemed as unsafe. However, it was renamed ...
It is extremely dangerous for humans to take horse tranquilizers. The horse medication can be much more concentrated and in a larger dose. It would be difficult ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com