How big is Mount St. Helens?

Answer

Mount St. Helens, an active stratovolcano, has an elevation of 8,363 feet. It is located in Skamania County, Wash., in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States.

From March 16 to May 17, 1980, Mount St. Helens experienced a series of small earthquakes, which culminated in a catastrophic eruption on May 18. At the time, it was the deadliest and most economically destructive volcanic event in the history of the United States.

The eruption impacted the size of the mountain, creating a crater 1.2 miles across east to west, 1.8 miles across north to south, and 2,084 feet deep. Prior to the eruption, it stood at 9,677 feet in elevation; it lost 1,314 feet in the eruption. The mountain lost a volume of 0.67 cubic miles.

Q&A Related to "How big is Mount St. Helens?"
Mount St Helens is located in the state of Washington. It stands at an elevation of 8,365 feet. It is a part of the Cascade mountain range.
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1. Obtain a climbing permit if you plan to hike over 4,800 feet. You must read and sign the permit before beginning your hike and display the permit during the climb. Permits are
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Should we visit the west side or east side of Mount St. Helens? It takes about 3 hours to drive from Paradise to the west side of Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, and
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Geologists have estimated Mount Saint Helens, an active stratovolcano, to be about 40,000 years old. The peak, which collapsed during the 1980 eruption, only started ...
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