How Can I Find My Birth Mother Free of Charge?

Answer

Various online services help people find their birth mothers for free. They include Iwasadopted and Genesreunited among others. One may however be required to register so as to get a free account.
1 Additional Answer
The first step into finding your birth mother is to establish whether she is alive. Once you confirm that she is alive, start by asking your father (if he is alive) and relatives as much information as you can about her. Using the information that you have, register at genesreunited.co.uk, a website that will help you trace your mother for free.
Q&A Related to "How Can I Find My Birth Mother Free of Charge"
It would depend on whether your mother placed you up for an open or closed adoption. If it was an open adoption, you'll have an easier time finding her. But if its closed, and she
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1. Identify your birth mother's name by consulting your original birth certificate. To obtain your original birth certificate (if your adoptive parents had the birth certificate reissued
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If you were born in California, there is a free reunion registry for adoptees and biological birth family members including birthmother, birthfather, and birthsiblings to locate each
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1 Search online for the official website of your county of birth's public health department. Different counties may have other similar names for this department, such as the Health
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Explore this Topic
The best way to find your birth mother is to have your adoption records unsealed. These records will contain her name at the time of your birth and her address ...
The best way to find your birth mother is to have your adoption records unsealed. These records will contain her name at the time of your birth and her address ...
You can talk to your adoptive parents and see if they have any information on your birth mother. Check the hospital where you were born and see if they have any ...
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