How Do Animals Protect Themselves?

Answer

Animals protect themselves in way too many ways to list here. However, all reactions will usually come down to fight or flight. Either the animal will protect itself by attacking what is causing it duress, or it will try and run, hide, or defend itself however it can. Different animals have different methods of doing both fight or flight.
Q&A Related to "How Do Animals Protect Themselves?"
i dont have any answer i need answer
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The whale's gargantuan size offers protection from predators. The size of some marine animals protects them simply because they have no natural predators. These include adult whales
http://www.ehow.com/info_8604463_do-animals-ocean-...
dogs (wolves coyotes domestics) run in packs protection is strength in numbers and they bite horses protect themselves by running in a herd. stallions protect the mares from attack
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200909...
There are a number of animal species that are able to protect themselves
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1 Additional Answer
How an animal protect itself depends on the animal. Some animals have fur coats that help them blend into the scenery, or even help them look bigger than they are. Some animals have sharp teeth and claws which deter most predators. Some animals are just good at running, and they depend on their speed to flee an attacker.
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