How Do Dolphins Use Sound?

Answer

Dolphins use sound so as to help them in hunting, navigating and communicating. They have the sensory ability used for locating food and for navigation underwater called echolocation. Sounds are reflected or echoed back from objects and these are thought to be received by an oil filled channel in the lower jaw and conducted to the middle ear of the animal. When swimming normally, the sounds emitted are generally low frequency. The echoes from these sounds provide information about the seafloor, the shorelines, underwater obstacles, water depth and the presence of other animals underwater.
Q&A Related to "How Do Dolphins Use Sound"
They direct clicks into the water and the clicks rebound off solid objects and echo back to the them. Dolphins listen for the rebounding clicks to identify what the object is and
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_are_dolphins_making_...
It is almost a squeal.
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-the-sound-t...
Dolby Digital (Dolby 5.1)
http://www.imdb.com/rg/maindetails-title/warp-link...
Access to oestrus females tends to be the main driver of male sociality. This factor can lead to complex behavioural interactions between males and groups of males. Male bottlenose
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17406672
1 Additional Answer
Dolphins use sound to determine positions of fish in the sea. They send out sounds known as clicks and interpret the echoes that bounce back to them. This helps them determine the location and speed of the fish.
Explore this Topic
Dolphin have their own unique way of talking to each other. Their language is made up of different sounds. They can also make whistle sounds and clicking sounds ...
Dolphins can hear frequencies up to 150 kHz. As a part of its echolocation, Dolphins use high frequency click sounds to produce and listen to sounds. ...
One of the most popular dolphins is the bottle nosed dolphin. The sounds they make are how they talk to each other. These dolphins have blowholes on the top of ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com