How do I calculate the pitch of a roof?

Answer

The pitch of a roof is calculated by finding the amount of rise per foot run. It is calculated using an online roof pitch calculator which requires you to key in the measurements of the roof width, length and the rise. The pitch is represented by a triangular shaped drawing and expressed in inches.
Q&A Related to "How do I calculate the pitch of a roof?"
1. Use a ruler to measure and make a mark 12 inches from the end of the level. Use a ladder to access the roof. 2. Lay a 2-foot board perpendicular to the slope of the roof so that
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1. Measure 12 inches on the level. Mark the length with the marker. Many levels are equipped with a ruler on the side, but marking it will allow it to be more visible. Ad. 2. Climb
http://www.wikihow.com/Calculate-Roof-Pitch
Place a four foot long level on the roof, parallel with the ground. With one end touching the roof and the other end in the air, read the bubble. on the level. When the bubble says
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One way to measure is to mark a level at 12" from the top of the roof, hold it
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1 Additional Answer
The pitch of a roof is determined by identifying the amount of rise per foot run. You can also determine the pitch of a roof by using a level and a framing square from the top of the roof. You can also use a pitch finder tool to calculate the same.
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