How Do Sick Notes Work?

Answer

Sick notes are a proof of illness usually required by your employer if you have been sick and off work for more than seven days. A sick note is a written note signed by your doctor stating that you are either not fit to work or you are fit for work and can continue with your job. You shouldn't be charged or billed for a sick note.
1 Additional Answer
Sick notes work to prove the validity of one's illness, especially in circumstances where absences are strictly regulated or not permitted. This note can only be gotten from a doctor and can only be acquired if you are examined in the period when you were sick.
Q&A Related to "How Do Sick Notes Work"
1 Be legitimately ill. Doctors refuse sick note requests from patients who do not need them. Present a justifiable illness or injury before asking for a sick note. Ad 2 Review your
http://www.wikihow.com/Get-a-Sick-Note
1. Write the note on stationery paper or a note card that displays comforting images, such as a peaceful nature scene; flowers; animals; a positive, humorous cartoon; or other images
http://www.ehow.com/how_4410806_write-comfort-note...
Like this; I'm ill. ( Another Answer. Personally I like: Dear Teacher, _ wasn't in school on _ because he/she was not feeling well with a _ . (Explain if you want) Sorry for any inconvenience
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_write_a_sick_...
16 May 2007 (UK) See more »
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