How Does a Catapult Work?

Answer

Catapults work by storing tension either in twisted ropes or in a flexed piece of wood in the same way an archery bow does, but on a larger scale. The gears are important, because they create a winch which allows a person to put a great deal of energy into the catapult over a period of time.
Q&A Related to "How Does a Catapult Work"
A catapult works because the gears and rope create a winch mechanism that winds up tightly. When the rope is released it launches an object into the air preferably at something. Look
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The catapult dates back to medieval times when men of the age realized they could launch large objects a great distance without much effort. In more modern times now we guns, bombs,
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_does_a_catapult_work
1. Cut off the peaked top of an 8 oz. milk carton with scissors. The carton is the base of the mini catapult. Then, starting from the open top, cut off two-thirds of one side of the
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Gallbladders works on the principle to break down fat from food once it is eaten. The gallbladder holds bile that releases it into the small intestine when this occurs. Look here
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Health/Diseases/how...
2 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: how does a catapult work
How Does a Catapult Work?
"Catapult" is the name given to a variety of related siege weapons used to hurl projectiles without the use of explosives. Crucial during Medieval times and even earlier, these simple machines make use of stored energy to release a projectile, or... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
The catapult has a basket on the end of a movable arm to hold the object. Tension is applied to the arm, and the bindings are cut or removed. The arm then succumbs to the tension and flips to the other side, like pulling a rubber band and then releasing the object which is propelled forwards.
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