How does a Ceramic Heater Work?

Answer

Ceramic heaters have a ceramic plate that gets heated by gas or coils. This plate then distributes the heat really evenly through to the room. It isn't hidden behind glass or anything, so it's out in the open more so than some heaters. This makes it really warm. You can find out more information here: heating-and-cooling.hardwarestore.com
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1 Additional Answer
Ceramic heater's heating element has specific resistance. Whenever current is passed through a resistive material, heat is developed, according to Joule's law.
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