How Does a Lightning Rod Work?

Answer

Metal attracts electricity, so it attracts lightning. A lightning rod is mounted high in the air and works by getting itself electrocuted and sending that shock down a metal rod into the ground.
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Ask.com Answer for: how does a lightning rod work
How Does a Lightning Rod Work?
The lightning rod was actually invented over two-hundred years ago in 1749 by Benjamin Franklin in his process of attempting to explain exactly how lightning worked. He speculated that if a large iron pole with a sharpened tip were placed higher than... More »
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Source: www.ehow.com
Explore this Topic
A lightning rod is a wire mounted on top of buildings to protect it from lightning. It was invented by Benjamin Franklin in June 1652 in Philadelphia. ...
The function of a lightning rod is to attract lightening during storms. Its main purpose is absorbing the lightening electricity which may be destructive. ...
The purpose of a lightning rod is to route the strike energy to a ground. This is much the same way the ground wire in a ground fault circuit interrupter works ...
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