How Does a Speaker Work?

Answer

Speakers work in an amazing way. They have two magnets i.e. an electromagnet and a permanent magnet which interact with each other pushing the coil back and forth swiftly. When the coil moves, it pushes and pulls on the speaker cone which vibrates the air in front of the speaker thus generating sound waves.
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How Does a Speaker Work?
Speakers--from tiny earphones to the colossal ones used at rock concerts--all work on the same principles, and they all work much like our ears do. Sound travels in waves through the air. We hear sounds when these waves hit our eardrums and cause the... More »
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Source: www.ehow.com
A speaker comes in different types and sizes in terms of the output it produces when sounding. When speakers produce sound, the sound waves change the air pressure which then hits the eardrum. They take the content on CDs, DVD or TV and recreate the recorded sound by changing the air pressure inside then expelling it outwards. There is an electromagnet inside the speaker which is not mobile and pulses of electricity pass through its coil and the magnetic field is changed thus attracting and repelling the permanent magnet leading to vibration that is produces as sound that we can hear.
Speakers come in different types and sizes in terms of the output they produce when sounding. When they produce sound, the sound waves change the air pressure which then hits the eardrum. They take the content on CDs, DVD or TV and recreate the recorded sound by changing the air pressure inside then expelling it outwards. There is an electromagnet inside the speaker which is not mobile and pulses of electricity pass through its coil and the magnetic field is changed thus attracting and repelling the permanent magnet leading to vibration that is produces as sound that we can hear.
When speakers are at work, an electric signal reproduced by an amplifier passes through the speaker wire which varies in terms of its frequency and its power. The signal enters the speaker through the binding posts and the wiring inside the cabinet and is sent to the voice coil. The force on the voice coil undulates back and forth, as the signal's amplitude and frequency changes. The voice coil rapidly vibrates along the axis of the magnet structure causing the cone to vibrate. The air molecules immediately around the cone are pressurized and they translate into the sounds we hear.
Inside a speaker you will find a cone, an electromagnet and a permanent magnet. For a speaker to change an electrical signal into a sound that can be heard, speakers have an electromagnet, which is a metal coil that creates a magnetic field when electric current flows through it. This coil operates much like a normal magnet, with one particular quality; turning backwards the direction of the current in the coil flips the poles of the magnet. In the interior of a speaker, an electromagnet is positioned in front of a permanent magnet. The permanent magnet is put firmly in place whereas the electromagnet is mobile. As pulses of electricity go through the coil of the electromagnet, the direction of its magnetic field is quickly transformed. This means that it is in turn attracted to and turned away from the permanent magnet, vibrating back and forth. The electromagnet is joined to a cone created of flexible material such as paper or plastic which increases these vibrations, producing sound waves into the surrounding atmosphere and towards your ears.
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