How Does Central Locking Work?

Answer

These is an electromechanical system that can be operated manually or by a remote, keyless entry system. The door locks are open and closed using motors. The motor is normally connected with one side permanently to the 12 Volt supply the relays connect the other side to the ground. The transmitter of the remote control can produce unique coded infrared (IR) or radio frequency (RF) signals to the car's ECM (Electronic Control Module) by pressing the different buttons on it. The ECM is the signal processing unit. It decides the amount of polarity of power to be supplied to different solenoid or motors of actuators upon receiving the IR or RF signals from remote controller.
Q&A Related to "How Does Central Locking Work?"
1. Raise the driver side door lock to the "unlocked" position. Disconnect the car battery by loosening the battery connections. Remove the ground (black cable) first and
http://www.ehow.com/how_8010381_repair-faulty-cent...
Try changing the fuse.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_the_central_locki...
1. Find out the location of switch of car light, car horn and central locking. Ad. 2. Connect each switch to the terminals of each channel on the receiver (as the diagram shows) 3
http://www.wikihow.com/Control-a-Car-Light,-Horn-o...
first check blown or missing fuses 2nd locate locking module open it up and fire the neg side of the relays with a test light if the locks fire your master door motor is shot located
http://www.fixya.com/support/t688527-repair_centra...
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