How Fast Is Terminal Velocity?

Answer

A free falling object achieves its terminal velocity when the downward force of gravity (Fg) equals the upward force of drag (Fd). Mathematically, an object asymptotically approaches and can never reach its terminal velocity. Terminal velocity is said to be is about 195 km/h (120 mph or 55m/s).
Q&A Related to "How Fast Is Terminal Velocity"
Terminal velocity, the maximum velocity an object will reach, is about 135 mph for a
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How fast terminal velocity depends of the density and shape of an object and the density and viscosity of the liquid or gas that the object is falling through. report this answer.
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If the penny is in a vaccum, the penny has no terminal velocity because verminal velocity is when the resistance against the falling penny is equal to the force of gravity. So if
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It is dependent on the object and several other factors. A free falling object achieves its terminal velocity when the downward force of gravity (Fg)equals the upward force of drag
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1 Additional Answer
There is no one given number for terminal velocity. It is determined by the way an object is shaped. For example a skydiver can change his terminal velocity by changing the form he takes. You can find more information here: http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/phy00/phy00800.htm
Explore this Topic
Terminal velocity is a term that refers to the state which an object achieves when the force of drag on it is equal to the force of gravity acting on it. This ...
The speed of terminal velocity varies directly with the ratio of weight to drag. More drag means a lower terminal velocity, while more weight means a higher terminal ...
When a falling object has reached its terminal velocity its acceleration is constant. This is called constant velocity. Speed and velocity are two different things ...
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