How High Can a Helium Balloon Go before It Pops?

Answer

The helium balloon will rise into the air because it is lighter than the air. It will continue to rise until the air is more dense than the helium. There is no way of knowing at what altitude this would happen.
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How High Can a Helium Balloon Go Before it Pops?
Balloons frequently--whether intentionally or accidentally--escape into the sky. These balloons float up into the atmosphere until they either pop or begin to deflate and return to earth. While it's not possible to know the exact altitude a helium... More »
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Q&A Related to "How High Can a Helium Balloon Go before It Pops..."
In 1987, a British man, Ian Ashpole, set the reported world record for highest helium-balloon flight. Using 400 helium balloons with radii of one foot, he achieved the height of one
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Helium balloons explode at a height of about 28,000 - 30,000 ft. 2
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The balloon you get at safeway is not a helium balloon. It contains party gas which is a mixture of 70% nitrogen and 30% helium. It is bouyant enough to lift the balloon but not to
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Well, it obviously depends on what type of balloon you have. There are rubber party balloons, mylar party balloons, and hot air balloons. Hot air balloons will not pop since they
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How high a helium balloon will go varies depending on the temperature of the air and the weather conditions surrounding the balloon. In most experiments, a partially ...
A helium balloon can travel up until the density is the same as the air density. They can pop or be caught in wind. The only way to know how far a helium balloon ...
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