How Many Players Are There in a Hockey Team?

Answer

There are various types of hockey such as ice hockey, street hockey and field hockey; whereby, each of this has a different number of players required. For example, in field hockey, each team has eleven players and five substitute players, although the number of substitutions to be made is usually not limited.
Q&A Related to "How Many Players Are There in a Hockey Team"
Field hockey: A team may have up to 16 players, of which 11 may be on the pitch at any time. There is no discrimination between players in different positions. Ice Hockey: NHL teams
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1 Additional Answer
A hockey team is comprised 11 players on the field from each team with an allowance of 5 substitutes. Substitutions are not limited but may not be made during a penalty corner. Most teams arrange themselves into fullbacks, midfielders and forwards.
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