How many wheels do airplanes have?

Answer

The number of wheels on a plane differs depending on the size and type of plane. A Boeing 747 for example has 18 wheels. There are 16 main landing-gear wheels and two nose landing-gear wheels.

Most planes have the same configuration of wheels even if they have a different number of them. Conventional landing gear dictates that there will be wheels under each wing and one under the nose or sometimes tail for stabilization. Landing gear is one of the most important parts of the plane as landing accidents account for between 30 and 40 percent of all accidents depending on the type of aircraft.

Q&A Related to "How many wheels do airplanes have?"
1. Approach the landing as usual, reducing power to idle as you cross the threshold. 2. Add 100-300 RPM just before you begin your flare to give yourself better control on your rate
http://www.ehow.com/how_2309274_wheel-land-tailwhe...
THREE : all (or nearly all) planes have two landing gear wheels and one wheel that is either a nose gear or a tail gear wheel, for a total of three - larger planes can have more than
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_wheels_in_a_air...
1. Make your approach as you normally would in any airplane. Ad. 2. As you cross the threshold reduce power to idle. 3. Just before you begin your flare add 100 to 300 RPM of power.
http://www.wikihow.com/Wheel-Land-a-Tailwheel-Airp...
Most of them are around 20 to 95 feet. It all depends on the weight though given that
http://www.chacha.com/question/how-big-are-airplan...
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