Is a Notarized Document Legally Binding?

Answer

A legally binding document is a document that is legally binded by the court of law. For a document to be legally binding, it must be verifiably authentic, which is why the documents are signed, notarised and witnessed.
Q&A Related to "Is a Notarized Document Legally Binding?"
A notarized legal document, like a contract or oath of witness, is signed by one or more parties. The seal of the notary declares that at the time of the signing, each party presented
http://www.ehow.com/facts_5004459_what-legal-notar...
It depends on the document but generally, forever, until it is superseded by a new document. For example: an easement agreement between two parties, signed, notarized and recorded
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_long_is_a_notarized_...
There are two types of notarized documents so it is important to be aware of the difference as they are very different documents legally. 1) A sworn statement. This is sworn to under
http://www.webanswers.com/custody/how-legal-is-not...
It isn't so much the document that's important. unless it's just a notarized copy - in which case it's just a verification that it's a true and accurate copy. The importance of the
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1 Additional Answer
A legally binding document is a document that legally binds its parties through a court of law. It requires signatures from all the parties mentioned in the document to make the document applicable. The document contains any agreements set by two or more parties involved or affected by it.
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