Why Is a Tomato a Fruit and Not a Vegetable?

Answer

The tomato, those round red items we like to slice up and put our salads, is a fruit. It is the fruit of the overall tomato plant. It is classed as a fruit because it has seeds therefore is a flowering plant. The tomato however, has a much lower sugar content than other fruits which is why it is a lot less sweeter.
Q&A Related to "Why Is a Tomato a Fruit and Not a Vegetable?"
Tomatoes are a mildly acidic, pulpy food. Tomatoes come in shades of red, yellow, orange or green that vary depending on maturity and species. Tomatoes have a spherical shape though
http://www.ehow.com/about_6552456_tomato-fruit-veg...
Botanically, fruits are seed-containing parts of a plant that derive from the ovaries in the flower, which is what tomatoes are. Embed Quote
http://www.quora.com/Why-is-a-tomato-a-fruit-and-n...
It depends whom you ask! Botanically speaking, it is a fruit because it has seeds - like a cucumber!
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Why_is_a_tomato_a_fruit_...
Fruit - in its strict botanical sense, the fleshy or dry ripened ovary of a
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-are-tomatoes-a...
3 Additional Answers
Ask.com Answer for: is a tomato a fruit or a vegetable
Scientifically speaking, a tomato is a fruit as it is developed from the ovary in the base of the flower and contains seeds of a plant.
Tomatoes are scientifically classified as fruits since they have seeds and are produced from the ovary in the base of the flower of the tomato plant.
The tomato is a fruit, specifically a berry.
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