Monocytes Absolute High?

Answer

Monocytes are a type of white blood cell. When evaluating cells, counts can be taken where the total of one cell type is calculated as a ratio of the total number of white blood cells. This is called a relative count. An absolute count, would be counting only the total number of monocytes as a stand alone figure. A high absolute monocyte count probably means that infection is occurring. A risk is that over time these cells can be depleted.
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Q&A Related to "Monocytes Absolute High?"
Monocytes are one of the classes of white blood cells. Absolute means the count your saw was the number of monocytes, not the percentage. If they're high, you may have an infection
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_Monocytes_Absolu...
Monocyte is a type of leukocyte, part of the human body's immune system. Monocytes have two main functions in the immune system: (1) replenish resident macrophages and dendritic cells
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200902...
Hello Tammy: The report has to be interpreted in light of the signs and symptoms you have. Most often increased MCV (average volume of red blood cell - measures the size of the cells
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Pathology-1640/2008/6/l...
Hello there, Monocytes are a type of white blood cell produced by the bone marrow and their role is to destroy infectious organisms that invade the body and cancer cells as well.
http://www.steadyhealth.com/WHAT_CAUSES_A_LOW_ABSO...
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The causes of low absolute monocytes include bone marrow diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and HIV. Other causes include autoimmune diseases and Lupus. Low absolute ...
Infection and high monocyte count, refers to the state where one is suffering from a certain defect, it also means having the monocytes in large amount but are ...
A monocyte is a type of white blood cell. When you have a high monocyte count, it indicates a severe infection typically caused by a blood infection or sepsis. ...
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