Notary Stamp?

Answer

A notary stamp is something a Notary Public uses when signing documents. It provides a legal affidavit that the document was witnessed by the Notary as it is a unique stamp that is issued to that Notary upon completion of their test. Each Notary Public has a number assigned to them that becomes a permanent part of their stamp. The fee to become a Notary and renew licensing includes the issuing and renewal of the stamp. Each time a Notary witnesses and signs a document, they must use their stamp to emboss the document as proof that they saw and signed the document.
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Q&A Related to "Notary Stamp?"
1. Complete a renewal application. This application may usually be obtained from the Secretary of State's office or website in the state in which you renew the notary commission (
http://www.ehow.com/how_6678954_renew-notary-stamp...
1. Obtain your Notary commission. Before a notary stamp is valid, the person using it must be commissioned as a notary in his or her state. For instructions on how to obtain your
http://www.wikihow.com/Get-a-Notary-Stamp
In most U.S. states, a notary can only affix their stamp or seal next to or underneath their signature in a notarial certificate of acknowledgment or a jurat. Notaries can not simply
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Where_can_a_notary_stamp
You can get something notarized (probably for free) at your bank. Court houses have them but you may need to pay a fee.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=201309...
Explore this Topic
1. Go to the website of the American Association of Notaries (AAN). The home page shows a picture of a United States map, which you can click on to receive information ...
The original notary stamp is one that is actually depressed into the document, leaving an embossed style stamp. Today, notary stamps are mostly just ink stamps ...
1. Put your name as it appears in your notary public commission. 2. Put the words "notary public." Then put the name of the state as specified by the ...
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