What is the onside kick rule?

Answer

Football's onside kick rule states that the kicking team can recover a kickoff and retain possession after the ball travels 10 yards from its kicking point. Onside kicks are a way for teams to keep possession after a scoring play.

A failed onside kick, one in which the kick goes out of bounds or the kicking team touches the ball before it has travelled 10 yards, gives the receiving team the possession of the ball. According to Sporting Charts, most onside kicks occur when the kicking team is desperate to score quickly, such as late in a game when they are losing.

Q&A Related to "What is the onside kick rule?"
The main rule is that the ball has to travel 10 yards downfield before it can be recovered by the kicking team prior to the opponents touching it. A kickoff is a free kick. Whoever
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_are_the_rules_for_a...
A kickoff (Any kick, not just onsides) is a free ball once it travels 10 yards. It does not matter if the receiving team touches the ball or not, the kicking team can recover it.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200912...
The ball does need to go ten yards. There is no 'too far' because an onside kick is simply defined as an intentionally short kick, but for the purpose of feasibility of recovering
http://www.quora.com/NFL/What-are-the-rules-for-th...
An onside kick in football has to travel forward the legally
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-are-the-rules-...
1 Additional Answer
Ask.com Answer for: onside kick rule
Onside Kick Rules
The onside kick is one of the most exciting plays in football. It is designed so that the team kicking off will have an opportunity to get the ball back quickly, without playing defense. It's most often used towards the end of the game when a team is... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
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An onside kick is used on a kick off in football. The ball is kicked in favor of the kicking team. An onside kick is risky because if the receiving team gets the ...
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