What is the unit of measurement used for paper thickness?

Answer

Manufacturers measure paper thickness in units called "mils." One mil is equal to one one-thousandth of an inch, and thicker paper provides better dispersal of ink. The name of this measurement for paper is its "caliper."

Consumers sometimes make the mistake of assuming that paper's weight is an indicator of its thickness. Weight indicates the pounds of a 500 sheet ream of paper cut to its standard size. Different types of paper have different standard sizes. Accordingly, 80-pound cover stock paper is a different thickness than 80-pound bond paper. Caliper offers the most reliable method of comparing thickness, especially when comparing paper of different types.

Q&A Related to "What is the unit of measurement used for paper..."
An instrument called micrometer is used to measure paper or card thickness.
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An average piece of paper is about .081 mm thick.
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If possible you can measure the height of a stack of say 500 papers and divide by 500. If you really need to measure just a single paper or you need high precision you can use a micrometer
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The most suitable instrument is dial gauge and with the dial gauge you get rather an accurate result than using a micrometer. The common unit measurement is micron. For comparatively
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