What is the difference between 'payor' and 'payer?'?

Answer

"Payer" and "payor" are interchangeable spellings of the word used to describe a person or organization who gives money for some kind of goods or services. Essentially, both "payer" and "payor" mean "one who pays."

According to the Merriam Webster Online Dictionary, a payer is "a person, organization, etc., that pays or is responsible for paying something." It lists payor as a non-preferred spelling variant of the word payer. The "-or" ending is sometimes used in medical and insurance documents such as when defining or describing third-party payors and responsibilities. In legal documents payor is used to describe a person required by law to make specific payments such as child support.

Q&A Related to "What is the difference between 'payor' and '..."
The preferred spelling is "payer." This version is most widely used and accepted by the pharmaceutical/biotech industry. The correct spelling, however, is "payor"
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Is+it+payer+or+payor
The country the person who wrote it is from. The payer is the one is pays money. The payee is the one being paid.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200902...
Essentially they both refer to the person who is paying for something (i.e. If you bought a soda, you are considered the payor from the stores perspective) Even though payor is the
http://www.webanswers.com/finance-investing/what-i...
KGSupport says: It is always handy to have a dictionary available close by. There are also a good number of free online dictionaries. “Payer” and “Payor” are
http://www.kgsupport.com/questionFAQ.html
Explore this Topic
The terms payer and payor both refer to someone who is paying for something. The difference is a payer is someone who pays. A payor is when payment is made for ...
In English, the word payor means a transfer of wealth from one transfer. It is very similar to the word payer. However, with the word 'payor' the payment is usually ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com