What Is the Difference between Primary Diagnosis and Principal Diagnosis?

Answer

A primary diagnosis is the first diagnosis that is made in an outpatient setting based on the symptoms of the patient. The principal diagnosis is the condition of the patient that is made after studying the patient and their admission to the hospital. The difference between the two is based on first assessment of patient to study of patient.
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