What Is a Property Setback?

Answer

According to the construction laws, property setbacks mean the distance that must be kept between a new construction and a road side. There must be enough distance to allow for public safety, privacy and even road expansion.
Q&A Related to "What Is a Property Setback?"
A property setback is a restriction that prevents a homeowner from building a structure too close to his neighbor's property. Setbacks establish a distance from a property boundary
http://www.ehow.com/info_8465205_property-setback....
Fences are governed locally. You need to call your town building department to determine the rule in your locality.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_the_law_in_Illin...
The distance from the curb or other established line within which no buildings may be erected. See also building line . Example: A 50-ft setback is shown in Figure 176. FIG. 176.
http://www.answers.com/topic/setback-line
The line that you must build behind! Create neighborhood conformity!
http://www.zillow.com/advice-thread/What-are-prope...
1 Additional Answer
A property line setback is a legal term that is used to describe the distance between the street, the pipelines for water or sewage, the fences, or even other properties and a person's legal area to build on their own property. For example, a property line setback might be the distance that is enforced between a house and the road in front of that house. Setbacks are the distance between some object of public use and a private construction.
Explore this Topic
To draw property lines on a map, you will need to have an accurate survey of the property. With the survey, you can overlay the map onto it and then trace the ...
Property lines are normally defined by state-licensed land surveyors. They will install survey stakes around your home, using a map called as Plat.If you are trying ...
To locate property lines, you can first check the deed of your home to know where your property ends and the neighbor's property begins. You can also check with ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com