Qualifications for Federal Judges?

Answer

A federal judge is a judge that serves in a federal court. Article I federal judges handle judgments of magistrate and bankruptcy cases. Article III federal judges serve in the Supreme Court of the United States are appointed by the President of the United States. The only qualification for being an Article I federal judge is that they must have been a lawyer before becoming a judge. This qualification is not needed for district judges, circuit judges, or Supreme Court justices.
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Q&A Related to "Qualifications for Federal Judges?"
Answer There is no specific qualifications stated in the constitution for fedral judges.
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The Constitution sets forth no specific requirements.
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No qualifications are listed in the Constitution. Typically, a federal judge is of the same party as the president, been politically active prior to being appointed, donated money
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Federal judges are appointed to their positions by the President and after they are appointed it is the job of the Senate to hold a confirmation hearing to ensure their appointment.You
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Ask.com Answer for: qualifications for federal judges
Qualifications to Become a Federal Judge
There are four different types of federal tribunals under the United States Constitution. They are Article I legislative tribunals, Article II executive tribunals, Article III judicial tribunals and Article IV territorial tribunals. All employ federal... More »
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