Role of Government in a Mixed Economy?

Answer

The mixed market economy was founded on free market principals, which uses government regulations and monitoring in order to control pricing and supply and demand issues and regulates natural monopolies. It provides welfare or unemployment to those without jobs or those that cannot support themselves. Consumers can guide the economy by the purchases they do or do not make and by their votes during elections. When consumers have concerns over product safety, the government responds by creating agencies to meet the concerns.
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Q&A Related to "Role of Government in a Mixed Economy?"
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