What is an oratorical speech?

Answer

An oratorical speech is a speech delivered in the style of an orator. The term itself is somewhat redundant, as the words "oratorical" and "orator" both relate to the practice of giving speeches.

According to Dictionary.com, the word orator means "a person who delivers an oration; a public speaker, especially one of great eloquence." Therefore, an oratorical speech would be one delivered especially eloquently. "Oration" also implies a speech that is generally given under special circumstances, such as a funeral, a graduation, a retirement party or a wedding. An oratorical speech would accordingly be a speech delivered for a special occasion.,

Q&A Related to "What is an oratorical speech?"
An oratorical speech is a memorized rendition of an address or part of an address by a well-known orator. For example, you may have heard someone read Daniel Webster's speech, "
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for monologues from movies, you can use the website whysanity.net i found a good monologue from the movie, Happy Gilmore. You can find monologues in books too
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1. Decide on a topic and then do the research to find important details and facts. Make notes as you proceed through the research process. Keep in mind your time limit. 2. Write out
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I could provide some information. Please feel free to send me your message.
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