What is the definition of a triple beam balance?

Answer

A triple beam balance is an instrument used to obtain precise measurements of masses. The reading error of a standard triple beam balance is only 0.05 grams.

A triple beam balance has a pan on which users place objects to weigh and three beams that each have a slider. When the pan is empty and the sliders are placed at the leftmost position, the balance should have a reading of zero. When measuring an object's mass, the 100-gram slider is moved to the right until the indicator falls below the zero mark. The slider is then moved back a notch. Then, the same process is repeated with the 10-gram slider and the 1-gram slider to arrive at the object's mass.

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Q&A Related to "What is the definition of a triple beam balance..."
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The triple beam balance is a very accurate balance that determines the mass of an item. Its margin of error is only .05 grams, making it the go-to balance beam for a variety of purposes
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The triple beam balance is used to measure masses very precisely; the reading error is
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an ancient device developed before the electronic age. Three beams were used to hold sliding weights - typically milligrams, 10ths of grams and 10s of grams allowing accurate weights
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