What Are Contact Forces?

Answer

A contact force refers to a force that acts at the point at which two objects come into contact with one another. Isaac Newton described this type of force as a force with all other dynamic forces.
2 Additional Answers
Contact force is a force that acts at the point of contact between two objects that are in contrast to body forces. They are described by Newton's Laws of Motion just like all other forces in dynamics. Contact forces are ubiquitous and are responsible for the most visible interactions between macroscopic collections of matter.
Contact forces are forces that act at the point of contact between two objects in contrast to body forces. They are ubiquitous and responsible for most visible interactions between macroscopic collections of matter. The forces are described by Newton's laws of motion as with all other forces in dynamics.
Q&A Related to "What Are Contact Forces"
1. Determine the total mass of the system by combining the masses of the individual bodies. For example, if the system consists of two blocks with masses of 4 kilograms (kg) and 8
http://www.ehow.com/how_8174908_calculate-contact-...
i just edited this for no reason yo n i g g a.
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( ′kän′takt ′förs ) (electricity) The force exerted by the moving contact of a switch or relay on a stationary contact.
http://www.answers.com/topic/contact-force
A non-contact force is a force applied to an object by another body that is not in direct
http://www.chacha.com/question/what-is-force-non-c...
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Examples of contact forces include: frictional forces, tensional forces, applied forces and resistance forces. A contact force is a type of force that results ...
Non contact force implies that the force is applied to another object without direct contact. The three non contact forces are gravity, magnetism and electricity ...
Contact forces are forces that act at the point of contact between two things. Examples of contact forces include normal forces, frictional forces, air resistance ...
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