What Are Intermediate Directions?

Answer

Intermediate directions are simply the directions or points that would fall in between your standard N, S, E, W points on a compass. The points in between are what we know as NE, NW, SE, SW and etc. Hope this helps!
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What Are Intermediate Directions?
The four cardinal directions are north, south, east and west, and they're often the first thing you learn about maps and navigation. Intermediate directions are between the cardinal directions, and they help people find a shorter way to their destination.... More »
Difficulty: Easy
Source: www.ehow.com
Q&A Related to "What Are Intermediate Directions"
Intermediate directions are directions that are not too difficult but not too easy either. They are directions that are in the middle of the road where concerning the level of difficulty
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The primary intermediate (also ordinal and/or intercardinal) directions are northeast, northwest, southeast and southwest. These directions are located directly between the cardinal
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Cardnial Directions: North, South, East, West. Intermediate Directions: Northeast, Southeast, Northwest, Southwest.
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Intermediate direction polarization is a phenomenon peculiar to
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Explore this Topic
Intermediate directions are directions that are not too difficult but not too easy either. They are directions that are in the middle of the road where concerning ...
Intermediate directions are directions that are not too difficult but not too easy either. They are directions that are in the middle of the road where concerning ...
Intermediate directions are the directions which lie between the four cardinal directions (N, S, E, & W). Intermediate directions are north-east (NE), north-west ...
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