What Are Intermediate Directions?

Answer

Intermediate directions are simply the directions or points that would fall in between your standard N, S, E, W points on a compass. The points in between are what we know as NE, NW, SE, SW and etc. Hope this helps!
Q&A Related to "What Are Intermediate Directions"
An example of a compass rose. Intermediate directions are the four points halfway between the cardinal directions; they are commonly used for navigation. While north, east, south
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THE POINTS HALFWAY BETWEEN THE CARDINAL DIRECTIONS. (North-South, North-East, North-West, ect. what is the definition of intermediate directions. Intermediate Direction = a small
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Intermediate direction polarization is a phenomenon peculiar to
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he four cardinal directions are north, south, east, and west. The points half way between the Cardinal Directions. NW. NE. SE. SW.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=200808...
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What Is Intermediate Directions?
The intermediate directions are northeast, northwest, southeast and southwest. They are also called ordinal and intercardinal directions. They are the directions in between the cardinal directions (north, south, east and west) on a compass.... More »
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Intermediate directions are the directions found between the four cardinal directions. The cardinal directions are north, east, south, and west, so the intermediate ...
Intermediate directions, also recognized as intercardinal or ordinal guidelines, are a mutual course-plotting tool or a small sketches on a map that display instructions ...
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