What Are Natural Magnets?

Answer

Natural magnets are objects that make a magnetic field around themselves and attract iron. One of the most common natural magnets is loadstone which was the first mineral used to make a compass. The problem with natural magnets is that they are much weaker than artificial magnets.
Q&A Related to "What Are Natural Magnets"
Lodestone is a magnetite crystal that has been exposed to a large magnetic field. Current theories are that lodestones are formed when large magnetite formations are struck by lightning
http://www.ehow.com/info_8064070_natural-magnets.h...
magnesium.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_a_natural_magnet...
The natural sciences include astronomy, biology, chemistry, Earth science, physics and all of the subgroups of each discipline, including, for example astrophysics, oceanography and
http://www.ask.com/web-answers/Education/Libraries...
The earth's magnetic field has reversed several times over the past few million years, and magnetic north became magnetic south. One way scientists chart reversals is through the
http://www.ehow.com/facts_6900175_magnetic-stripin...
1 Additional Answer
A natural magnet is a naturally occurring element with the ability to attract iron particles. The magnet has two different types of metal ions which cause an electron transfer in a specific path thus generating a magnetic field. An example of a natural magnet is Lodestone, which is a mineral whose composition is iron oxide with a crystal structure which when struck by lightning creates a magnetic field.
Explore this Topic
Lodestone is a naturally magnetic rock. It is also a permanent magnet that is made up of magnetite that has polarity and has the ability to attract, as well as ...
A magnet is a material or object that produces a magnetic field. Type of rock which is magnetic is Lodestones. They are naturally occurring magnetic rocks. ...
Cobalt is a ferromagnetic metal with a specific gravity of 8.9 (20°C). It shows extremely high magnetic permeability. Pure cobalt is not found in nature, but ...
About -  Privacy -  Careers -  Ask Blog -  Mobile -  Help -  Feedback  -  Sitemap  © 2014 Ask.com