What Causes the Coriolis Effect?

Answer

If you've ever looked into your toilet, then you have experienced one straight forward example of what the Coriolis Effect looks like. The Coriolis Effect is caused by the combination of the Earth's spinning and tilt on its axis. So, if you are in the Northern hemisphere, the winds flow to the right. In the Southern Hemisphere, to the left.
Q&A Related to "What Causes the Coriolis Effect"
The Earth completes one revolution on its axis every 24 hours. However, because the Earth is a sphere, the speed at which its surface moves depends on location. A person standing
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if earth did not rotate, global winds would blow in a straight line from the poles toward the equator. because earth is rotating, global winds do not follow a straight path. as winds
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The Coriolis effect is mostly caused by the horizontal acceleration component
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The earth is rotating, this is motion. The earth is spinning faster at the equator (tengential velocity wise, but the angular velocity is the same (1 rotation per 24 hours) than up
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1 Additional Answer
The Coriolis effect in physics is a deflection of moving objects while they are being viewed in a rotating frame. The mathematical expression for the Coriolis force appeared in 1835.
Explore this Topic
The Coriolis Effect is the deviation of a moving object's path to curve sideways such as water current due to the rotation of the Earth. You can find more information ...
Examples of the Coriolis effects include formation of hurricanes, how objects move when thrown outside a car's window, an aeroplane flying towards the equator ...
The Coriolis Effect works by keeping its horizontal motion and staying above the target. This happens when the object is released. The object will not stop moving ...
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