What does a learning support assistant do?

Answer

According to the National Careers Service, a learning support assistant, also known as teaching assistant, supports teachers and helps children with their educational and social development inside and outside of the classroom. Typically, a teaching assistant’s job includes getting the classroom ready for lessons, supervising group activities and supporting teachers in handling class behavior.

Additionally, the National Careers Service explains that a learning support assistant listens to children read, reads to them and tells them stories, helps students who need extra assistance to finish tasks, helps teachers in planning activities and completing records, looks after children, especially those with recent accidents, and clears away materials and equipment after lessons. A teaching assistant also takes part in training, performs administrative tasks, and helps with outings and sports events. Moreover, it is his responsibility to support students with specific needs and work with them individually and in small groups.

The BBC notes that learning support assistants work alongside a class teacher in primary and secondary schools. They primarily work with children within the classroom setting, but they also take students to an adjoining area or room where they do another activity, such as listening to children read or a booster session for those struggling in certain subjects. They perform tasks that enable the class teacher to focus on teaching.

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