What Does a Stock Broker Do?

Answer

To become a good stock broker, you must start early enough when you are in school and while you are there, join an investment club and developing an interest in stocks and their behaviour. You will need some training in stocks and hence when you go to college major in a business related discipline like finance , economics or business and after you have passed the required series 7 exam, series 63 exams and series 65 exams you will be qualified as a stock broker. As a stock broker, you will need to be aggressive trustworthy and confident enough to convince clients to invest their money with you in stocks.
4 Additional Answers
A stockbroker is one who invests in stock market for individuals or corporations. Buying and Selling of stocks for individual or corporations will happen through stock brokers.
A stock broker refers to a regulated professional person who buys and sells shares and other securities through the market makers or Agency Firms on behalf of investors and receives a commission for executing the buy and sell orders that have been submitted by an investor.
A stockbroker is a regulated professional broker who has the role of being the middleman between buyer and seller when a share or stock and other securities is traded and enable the trade to be completed smoothly. They may operate in three different ways, which are, in a discretionary manner by managing all investments and making decisions on behalf of their clients, may serve in an advisory capacity by providing investment advice to their clients or act only on the explicit instructions from their clients.
A stockbroker has the role of being the middleman between buyer and seller when a share or stock is traded and enable the trade to be completed smoothly. They may operate in three different ways, which are, in a discretionary manner by managing all investments and making decisions on behalf of their clients, may serve in an advisory capacity by providing investment advice to their clients or act only on the explicit instructions from their clients.
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