What Happens When Stomata Open?

Answer

When stomata open, it is typically during daylight. They do so to bring carbon dioxide into the leaf. This carbon dioxide that is brought in by the stomata is then converted into food energy that assists in photosynthesis.
Q&A Related to "What Happens When Stomata Open?"
Stomata open to allow gaseous exchange between the plant and the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide uptake resumes and metabolic processes such as photosynthesis are facilitated. Loss of
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Stomata open to allow gaseous exchange between the plant and the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide uptake resumes and metabolic processes such as photosynthesis are facilitated.
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_happens_when_the_st...
If the stomata were open all the time the plant
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You'll trigger an alarm, unless you can open and close it before the electrons in the alarm system have had a chance to trigger the alarm circuit. The electrons move at roughly the
http://www.quora.com/What-happens-if-I-open-this-d...
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What Happens When Stomata Open?
Stomata open to allow gaseous exchange between the plant and the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide uptake resumes and metabolic processes such as photosynthesis are facilitated. Loss of water vapor is no longer prevented as transpiration continues.... More »
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